"Transforming Lives Through The Love of Christ"

Christmas Magic

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, our son-in-law, Mike, introduced us to a magician/illusionist/entertainer by the name of Michael Carbonaro. His T.V. show is called “The Carbonaro Effect”, which is basically a hidden camera he uses to capture the reactions of people as he uses sleight of hand to fool people into thinking they are seeing something that they believe is real.  For those old enough to remember, it is basically Candid Camera with practical jokes paired with magic.  One of my favorite skits was when he removed the dough from the bagel.  My son and I were laughing so hard there were tears in our eyes.  (We were tired and stuffed and it was also about 1:30 in the morning which helped.)  You can see this “magic trick” here:
Carbonaro Effect
Carbonaro Effect
     I enjoy watching magicians and am amazed by what they can do.  I know that it is not “magic” and they use all different kinds of “tricks” to fool your brain but I still ask out loud, “How did they do that?”  It all seems so beyond my ability to understand.  Yet, if I was a magician myself, I likely would either know exactly how it was done or have a pretty good idea how it was done.  Because its not magic, its trickery.
      People often talk about the “Magic Of Christmas”, meaning the feelings associated with the Christmas season.  People think back to fond childhood memories, embrace the innocence and wonder of children and share times of celebration and fun.  The decorations along with the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of the season make it a “magical” time of year.  And when someone experiences a miracle or hears the bells of an angel getting it’s wings, they are convinced there is something magical about this time of year.
      There is nothing more “magical” than God becoming a baby.  Try to explain that one!  Even Michael Carbonaro can’t explain how the God of all the universe, the Creator of the world, the Sustainer of life, the All Powerful, All Present, All Knowing Being could limit Himself and incarnate, becoming flesh and blood.  All God becoming all human.  Not done by magic or trickery. No mind-manipulation or brain-bending.  No hidden cameras or sleight of hand.  It is no practical joke.  God has come for us.
      As we conclude the first week of Advent and enter this second week, hold on to the “Magic of Christmas”, of God becoming man, and let it astound you, amaze you, make you laugh with delight and wonder and say out loud: “How did He do that?”


What do you think?  How does it make you feel?